White privilege, White thinking, White spaces: A brief comment

cozy-ideas-people-clipart-black-and-white

 

Students of politics and the social sciences will no doubt be familiar with these concepts but, they may be unfamiliar to many (as a science graduate they were unknown to me until very recently). They have been used in articles about the NZ education system and the achievement gap for maori linklink . The purpose of this blog is to very briefly outline a little of the background to these terms.

The concept of ‘white privilege’ is associated with identity studies, collectively – critical race theory, intersectionality, postcolonial studies, and queer theory which developed out of post-modernism (which was heavily influenced by Marxism.) Key features are the identification of oppressed and oppressor groups and discrimination as the sole cause of inequality in measured outcomes. Oppressed/oppressor pairs include white/black, male/female, straight/gay, feminist/transgender, and even attractive/unattractive. In keeping with its postmodern origins, scientific evidence is often disregarded, dismissed disparagingly as the product of a white male patriarchy.

While most of us are sympathetic to social justice causes, the discourse emanating from identity studies is extreme. Some examples – gender is totally socially constructed, only white people can be racist, or closer to home, the claim by the NZ Ministry of Education that the achievement gap for maori students is due to unconscious racial bias of teachers (read about this here). Never mind the dozen or so other causal factors that might be in play.

It is not that discrimination does not exist and has not existed in the past for the aforementioned oppressed groups, but personal or systemic discrimination has become the blanket explanation and moral trigger point for explaining every disparate statistic between unequal groups in society. Stereotyping white people as privileged is unhelpful and simplistic and begs the question where do individuals of mixed heritage fit into the scheme of things?